Fungal corneal ulcer (Video)

This slit-lamp video shows a large, central corneal ulcer that was caused by fusarium fungus. Classically, fungal ulcers are described as gray, feathery borders, with satellite lesions. In reality, the only way to determine the real pathologic cause is with a good culture (molds take forever to grow and require a deep sample) and time course.

Fungal ulcers like this are difficult to treat and resolve slowly. The general medical therapy is topical amphotericin and oral/iv systemic coverage with fluconazole or voriconozole.

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fungalcorneahypopion.wmv (5.6 meg, Windows video file)

Screencaptures

Fungal ulcer
This photo shows a large central fungal ulcer. The borders are soft and feathery and culture eventually grew out fusarium. You can see a small hypopion at the bottom of the anterior chamber. This hypopion was presumed to be a sterile infiltrate as the eye never progressed to frank endophthalmitis. Fungus (especially the long-branching molds) have the ability to extend posteriorly through descemet’s membrane, and are thus more likely to cause infectious hypopions.
Fungus cornea
Classically, fungal ulcers are described as gray, feathery borders, with satellite lesions. In reality, the only way to determine the real pathologic cause is with a good culture (molds take forever to grow and require a deep sample) and time course.
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Dr. Timothy Root is a practicing ophthalmologist and cataract surgeon in Daytona Beach, Florida. His books, video lectures, and training resources can be found at:

7 COMMENTS

  1. Goodevening…
    Please,if you can,send to me to my e-mail all your educational ophthalmology videos.
    thanks

  2. plz send to me to my email all of your educational videoes thanks and so nice of you for this anticipation

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